Skanska’s bridges by the numbers

Bridges are some of our most eye-catching projects. We build and rehabilitate bridges of all types, from landmarks like the Bridge of Lions in St. Augustine, Fla., to interstate thoroughfares like Interstate Highway 10 over Florida’s Escambia Bay. We’ve overseen the seismic retrofitting of the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge in California, construction of the Cooper River Bridge (also known as Arthur J. Ravenel Bridge) in South Carolina, as well as worked on the iconic East River bridges in New York: the Brooklyn Bridge, Williamsburg Bridge, Manhattan Bridge and Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (formerly the Triborough Bridge).

In celebration of these feats of engineering, here is a look at some of Skanska’s bridge projects, by the numbers.

155 miles per hour: The speed of Hurricane Ivan’s winds that ruined sections of the Interstate Highway 10 twin bridges between Florida’s Escambia and Santa Rosa counties in 2004. Skanska designed and constructed two replacement bridges to stand 25 feet above water, more than twice the height of the original bridges.

215 feet: The height of the Bayonne Bridge after a Skanska joint venture raises the roadway by 64 feet. The bridge’s current 151-foot clearance cannot accommodate the next generation of new Panamax container ships, which will begin service from Asia by about 2015, following the widening of the Panama Canal.

1883: Year the Brooklyn Bridge, one of the oldest suspension bridges in the United States, was completed. We’re currently reconstructing the approaches and ramps in both Manhattan and Brooklyn.

35,000 tons: The amount of waste concrete and asphalt, together with 5,400 tons of recovered steel, that the Skanska team recycled at our 11th Street Bridge replacement project in Washington D.C. Our design-build team performed 70 percent of construction without affecting existing traffic flows.

78,000 vehicles: The number of cars, trucks and motorcycles that cross the Manhattan Bridge each day. The 5,800-foot-long bridge, which spans the East River between the boroughs of Brooklyn and Manhattan, was built in 1909. Years of use caused rapid deterioration to this historical and architectural monument, forcing the New York City Department of Transportation to initiate a massive reconstruction program. Skanska rehabilitated the bridge’s north spans.

2.5 miles: The length of the Cooper River Bridge. Skanska completed this design-build project in Charleston one year ahead of schedule. The 1,546-foot main span, which is 186 feet above the river, is one of the longest cable-stayed spans in North America.

17.6 miles of bridge/tunnel: The length of over-and-under water Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel, one of the Seven Engineering Wonders of the Modern World. We built the bridge-tunnel over three-and-a-half years through a joint venture with four other contractors.

25 feet: The height of Los Angeles’ Gold Line Bridge’s basket-like concrete columns that pay tribute to the indigenous people of the San Gabriel Valley and the oversize iconic roadside traditions of nearby Route 66. Skanska completed the 600-foot-long bridge in 2013.

3.3 million lbs: The weight of the steel Skanska used to strengthen the 350-foot tall main towers of the Williamsburg Bridge, during its rehabilitation and seismic retrofitting. Intermediate towers were strengthened with 1.8 million pounds of steel.

31 million lbs: the weight of extensive structural steel retrofit added to the Richmond-San Rafael Seismic Retrofit Project in California, which included the strengthening of the four-mile long bridge’s truss components and tower legs, the installation of special moment resisting pier frames, installation of seismic isolation bearings, viscous dampers, and seismic restrainers.

Skanska USA

Skanska USA

Skanska USA is one of the largest, most financially sound construction and development companies in the U.S., serving a broad range of clients in the public and private sectors, including those in transportation, power, industrial, water/wastewater, healthcare, life science, education, sports & entertainment, data centers, government, aviation and commercial industries.

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