Check out our top 12 construction time-lapse videos

Today, we’re taking a step back (and up) to offer a unique perspective on some of our most complex projects. Building anything new often takes several years, but nothing accelerates the construction process like a time-lapse video to transform a project before your eyes. The videos below highlight the conversion of an empty space or hole in the ground into something meaningful and impressive.

The World Trade Center Transportation Hub and Oculus

In 2016, the World Trade Center Transportation Hub opened in downtown Manhattan, the culmination of our 15-year journey in restoring and enhancing transportation access to Lower Manhattan. Our team fabricated and erected the hub’s “Oculus” – a Santiago Calatrava-designed structure comprised of approximately 11,500 tons of structural steel consisting of portals, arches and rafters that combined give the structure a unique shape similar to a bird in flight. To erect the Oculus, we used two highly specialized tower cranes manufactured explicitly for this unique project. The Oculus is the centerpiece of the new hub and will serve more than 250,000 pedestrians per day as the primary link for access to New Jersey PATH trains and 11 New York City subway lines. More than a national symbol, the Oculus is a global icon that symbolizes the successful rebirth of Downtown Manhattan.

99M Street, SE

In Washington, D.C., our team is developing and building 99M Street, SE, an 11-story, 234,000-square-foot Class A office building in Washington’s Capitol Riverfront neighborhood just steps from the Washington Nationals Ballpark. Located at the corner of 1st and M Streets, this prime office space will include a green roof and rooftop terrace, a club-grade fitness facility, secure bicycle storage and four levels of underground parking. The complex excavation for 99M began in November 2015 and nearly 500 construction workers have dedicated approximately 51,200 work hours to complete the excavation and foundation work this month. As part of the excavation process 34,000 cubic yards of soil and rock were removed from the site, enough to fill more than 10 Olympic-size pools.

The New York Wheel

In Staten Island, we completed the foundation for the New York Wheel, a 630-foot observation wheel that will rise over the southern end of New York Harbor and provide unique views of the Manhattan skyline. Our team executed two massive concrete placements for the observation wheel pile caps. Each placement saw nearly 4,000 cubic yards of 10,000 psi, self-consolidating concrete that was placed continuously over 14 hours.

Fore River Bridge

In Quincy, Massachusetts, our team transported a custom-built span from a shipyard down the Weymouth Fore River on a custom-built barge to the Fore River Bridge. Then, the nearly three million pounds of steel was lifted approximately 60 feet and installed between the two existing towers as the outgoing tide lowered it into place. A crucial factor was timing the ride of the river, which moves up and down as much as eight feet. The moving tide was necessary for floating in and properly placing the new span.

Philadelphia International Airport

After six months of detailed planning and coordination, we erected a 91,000-pound, 100-foot-long pre-assembled baggage conveyor bridge over the main airport departure road in less than eight hours. The work took place in the middle of the night to minimize any potential disruption to airport operations.

Capitol Tower

In Houston, our 35-story Capitol Tower office project – which is currently under development – started with a 19-hour, 20-minute concrete pour to create a mat foundation that varies between seven and nine-and-a-half feet thick. Our planning and execution of this 9,020 cubic-yard continuous pour was so precise that the actual duration was within three minutes of what we originally planned.

Philip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science

In Miami, we are building the state-of-the-art, 280,000-SF, multi-use science and technology museum, planetarium and aquarium being constructed in Museum Park in the Greater Miami Downtown area. The 500,000-gallon aquarium required a continuous concrete pour that took 24 hours and 49 minutes. This pour sets the foundation for the Gulf Stream Tank that will be home to a number of deep-sea species viewable from both top and bottom.

Recently, we installed a 31-foot, 13-inch thick, 60,000-pound viewing oculus in a complex crane operation that required five years of planning.

Second Avenue Subway

In New York City, our crews dug two-and-a-half miles of tunnels and caverns, set the tracks and installed the communications network for the Second Avenue Subway, which will move an estimated 200,000 people a day. The new line runs from East 63rd Street to East 96th Street connecting with midtown Manhattan and beyond. Excavations for the 86th Street station required the removal of 450,000 tons of material in order to create a subterranean “launch box” or starting point where the tunnel boring machine (TBM) could be assembled and begin its work.

MetLife Stadium

In East Rutherford, New Jersey, we built MetLife Stadium, one of the most sustainable and technologically advanced open-air stadiums with seats for close to 85,000 spectators. The stadium is home for the New York Giants and the New York Jets, which makes it the first facility built specifically to accommodate two U.S. National Football League (NFL) teams. Incorporating innovative methods both in the construction of the facility and in its design, our team worked in collaboration with both franchises to cater to the needs of two different teams.

Tampa International Airport (TIA)

In Tampa, Florida, our team is currently at work on our $130 million portion of the $1 billion Tampa International Airport (TIA) redevelopment plan, which includes the main terminal building expansion, construction of a new car rental facility and the new automated people mover. Last summer, our team unveiled the east side of the expansion, including two new restaurants, glass curtain walls and new, more modern finishes.

LaGuardia Airport

In New York, we are leading the design and construction of LaGuardia Airport through an innovative public-private partnership (PPP), which is the largest in the United States. With our partners, we will design, build, operate and maintain the Central Terminal B facility. Right now, multiple phases of work are being performed on site. The P-2 parking garage demolition has been completed, clearing the way for pile driving and foundation work on the new airport terminal building.

Have a cool project coming up that could make for an interesting time-lapse video? Contact us at USACommunications@Skanska.com.

Skanska USA

Skanska USA

Skanska USA is one of the largest, most financially sound construction and development companies in the U.S., serving a broad range of clients in the public and private sectors, including those in transportation, power, industrial, water/wastewater, healthcare, life science, education, sports & entertainment, data centers, government, aviation and commercial industries.

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Ready for Takeoff at Tampa International Airport

Air travelers passing through Tampa International Airport (TIA) will discover some significant changes the next time they arrive, as a major component of the Skanska-built transfer concourse opened to the public on Friday, July 22. When complete, Skanska’s $130 million portion of TIA’s largest expansion ever will include 65 new retail, dining and beverage locations.

“It’s all aimed at making the traveler experience more pleasant and more convenient,” says Danny Valentine, Communications Manager at TIA.  “Increased seating and more electrical charging stations were critical – as well as offering places to eat, drink and shop.”

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In this rendering for the project, a view from the existing monorail tracks, the roof of the new public dining and retail concourse curves up and away from the parking deck. Credit: Tampa International Airport.

Spanning approximately 18 months, more than 300 Skanska workers have worked on the expansion to date.

“From the start of the project, it was evident that the two most important missions for the owner were the safety of the patrons and workers, and the patrons travel experience so they can maintain the airport’s award-winning customer service ratings. So we knew we had to be safe and invisible,” said Roger Stephan, Senior Vice President on the project. “We continue to work with the TIA staff to enhance our phasing plan and signage to be as invisible as possible, working night shifts to minimize and almost eliminate all noise activities so travelers wouldn’t notice the ongoing construction.  Directional signage remains paramount to make sure passengers get where they need to be as fast as possible.”

“Working with Hillsborough County Aviation Authority (HCAA) to bring this first big main terminal reveal has taken a tremendous effort from everyone and should generate even more excitement as the rest of the program evolves,” said Denise Muth, Project Executive for Skanska USA. “We’re very proud to be part of this historic project with HCAA and look forward to more exciting unveilings as the work continues.”

Crews unveiled the east side of the expansion, including two new restaurants, glass curtain walls and new, more modern finishes. The space will invite more natural light into the space and expand the footprint that made the new amenities possible. And the airport took the opportunity to bring a little bit of Tampa to everyone who passes through.

“We wanted to bring a local feel to every one of our air travelers, so we incorporated local food and beverage options,” says Valentine. “Gasparilla’s is named after a mythical Spanish pirate captain who supposedly operated in Southwest Florida. Every year Tampa has a festival named after him. Our bar is even shaped like a pirate ship.”

The expansion is also serving a critical need to simply expand the footprint of the airport, which has seen its usage swell in recent years. “Passenger decongestion was a primary goal of this project as well as providing a more comfortable and user-friendly atmosphere. And it’s the first time we’ll have pre-security, outdoor dining options where you can watch the planes taking off and landing. Along with the Florida climate we expect it to be quite beautiful.”

Above: Time lapse video of Skanska-built East Side Expansion at Tampa International Airport.

View shows the construction of one of two glass curtain-walled dining and shopping concourses that opened on July 22, 2016. Courtesy: Tampa International Airport.

Skanska USA

Skanska USA

Skanska USA is one of the largest, most financially sound construction and development companies in the U.S., serving a broad range of clients in the public and private sectors, including those in transportation, power, industrial, water/wastewater, healthcare, life science, education, sports & entertainment, data centers, government, aviation and commercial industries.

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Breaking Ground at LaGuardia

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, Vice President of The United States Joe Biden, and a host of officials gathered at LaGuardia Airport on Tuesday to mark the start of construction of the Central Terminal Building – a key milestone for the project that is expected to help grow the airport into a world-class “front door to New York City,” according to the Governor.

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Vice President Joe Biden and NY Governor Andrew Cuomo share the stage at the official groundbreaking for the new LaGuardia Airport Central Terminal Project on Tuesday, June 14. Credit: Michael Benabib.

LaGuardia will be our largest global project ever, with a 70 percent share of the $4 billion contract, worth about $2.8 billion, and the largest public-private partnership in the United States.  As part of LaGuardia Gateway Partners (LGP), Skanska will help to finance, design and build a piece of this critical air hub, which is on pace to set a record in excess of 27 million passengers this year with 34 million anticipated by 2030.

“LaGuardia is a key driver of New York’s economy and transportation network, but for far too long it has been outdated, overcrowded, and unworthy of the Empire State,” Governor Cuomo said at the announcement.  “Today, we are not just breaking ground – we are building an entirely new LaGuardia and transforming it into a world-class transportation gateway for the 21st century. This state has always been built to lead and now that legacy continues with this unprecedented project that will drive growth and generate continued prosperity for generations to come.”

See new renderings for LaGuardia on the Governor’s flickr site, here.

The vision for the new LaGuardia includes the world’s first dual pedestrian bridges spanning active aircraft taxi lanes and connecting the terminal to concourses A and B.  The plan also includes a new 35-gate Terminal B, Central Hall, West Garage and related roadways and supporting infrastructure. The more than 1.3 million square feet of the new Central Terminal B is expected to achieve LEED Silver certification for sustainable design, a designation of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) by the U.S. Green Building Council.

Vice President Biden explained how the project exemplified what the United States needs the most at the moment – a reinvestment in critical infrastructure to fuel the economy. “The greatest city in the world needs the greatest infrastructure in the world. We rank 26th in the world in transportation infrastructure. How can that stand? New York will make an enormous difference in our economic resurgence.”

The Vice President also lauded the economic activity that will be created by the project – both temporary and permanent – including the union workers that will build the project, which is predicted to generate $1.3 billion in wages and $5.2 billion in regional economic activity, according to PANYNJ.

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Skanska’s Mike Viggiano, Richard Kennedy and Magnus Eriksson (5th, 6th and 8th from left, respectively) participate in the ceremonial groundbreaking for LaGuardia’s new Central Terminal Project on Tuesday, June 14. Credit: Michael Benabib.

“Governor Cuomo’s commitment to a modern, 21st Century Central Terminal at LaGuardia carries on the legacy of the airport’s namesake,” said Richard Cavallaro, President and CEO of Skanska USA. “Much like Mayor LaGuardia, who pushed for an airport in the city, the governor’s vision for building a modern facility at LaGuardia through a public-private partnership model not only will make getting to New York City easier for millions of people every year, it is a blueprint for how to smartly rebuild our country’s infrastructure. Skanska is honored to be part of the consortium that is financing and rebuilding an essential part of New York City’s transportation network.”

During construction, the existing terminal will remain fully operational and flights will not be affected. New facilities will begin opening in 2018, with scheduled substantial completion in 2022.

You can watch the entire ceremony here:

 

Skanska USA

Skanska USA

Skanska USA is one of the largest, most financially sound construction and development companies in the U.S., serving a broad range of clients in the public and private sectors, including those in transportation, power, industrial, water/wastewater, healthcare, life science, education, sports & entertainment, data centers, government, aviation and commercial industries.

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Building the Future at LaGuardia Airport

This is a bright moment in the history of Skanska.

Today we take pride in announcing that we — as member of LaGuardia Gateway Partners — have become the official redeveloper for LaGuardia Airport’s Central Terminal Building in New York City. It is our largest global project ever, at approximately $4 billion, and the largest public-private partnership in the United States.

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The importance of this project cannot be overstated, and will have a positive impact on air travel in the United States, with a ripple effect that will be felt around the world. It’s also terrific news for the local New York City community, which will benefit from the jobs created building and operating the new terminal.

The vision for the new LaGuardia is exciting, with the world’s first dual pedestrian bridges spanning above active aircraft taxi lanes and connecting the terminal to concourses A and B. The plan also includes a new 35-gate Terminal B, Central Hall, West Garage and related roadways and supporting infrastructure.

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We’re excited to start work on the new LaGuardia Airport right away, with most of the new terminal opening in 2020 and substantial completion during 2022.

You can read more about the project here and at the LaGuardia Gateway Partners website here.

Renderings credit LaGuardia Gateway Partners

Skanska USA

Skanska USA

Skanska USA is one of the largest, most financially sound construction and development companies in the U.S., serving a broad range of clients in the public and private sectors, including those in transportation, power, industrial, water/wastewater, healthcare, life science, education, sports & entertainment, data centers, government, aviation and commercial industries.

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In Airport World, how airports can maintain security during construction

Transportation security is increasingly a critical concern that contractors must help manage, as so many U.S. airports have renovation and expansion projects underway. Early planning is essential to this necessary element of airport building.

“Thinking about airport security must begin before stepping foot on the construction site, as parties look to address security concerns during pre-construction,” says Dwight Pullen, national director of Skanska USA’s Aviation Center of Excellence.

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At Tampa International Airport, we are focused on helping maintain a secure environment and uninterrupted airport operations in our work expanding the main terminal.

In a recent Airport World article, Dwight shared his thoughts on how to ensure uninterrupted security during construction. This includes engaging and communicating with stakeholders to keep airport operations fully functional. As Dwight notes, “construction simply must not create vulnerabilities in an airport’s security system. Rather, contractors have to partner with owners to plan effectively, coordinating with the [Transportation Security Administration], airport operations and other stakeholders to maintain operability and be secure on all fronts, starting with the technology we use on the job site.”

You can read more on how to minimize risk and enable a secure environment during aviation construction on pages 43-44 of the October issue of Airport World: http://issuu.com/airportworldmagazine/docs/aw5-2015.

Skanska USA

Skanska USA

Skanska USA is one of the largest, most financially sound construction and development companies in the U.S., serving a broad range of clients in the public and private sectors, including those in transportation, power, industrial, water/wastewater, healthcare, life science, education, sports & entertainment, data centers, government, aviation and commercial industries.

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Trends driving airport construction

American airports remain some of the busiest in the world, with nearly half of the world’s 30 busiest airports within the U.S. and domestic air travel at an all-time high of 743 million passengers taking flight in 2013. However, upgrades to aviation infrastructure have not kept pace with the increase in airport traffic or even at a level sufficient to accommodate the life cycle of our many dated terminal facilities. Until now.

Airport-Hub-2
At Philadelphia International Airport, we recently erected a baggage conveyor bridge over a main airport road at night so as not to disturb airport operations.

 

While funding challenges remain (especially as a consequence of the cap on PFCs),  as competition heats up between newly consolidated air carriers and as airports seek new revenue sources to upgrade or replace outdated facilities, the need for efficiency, flexibility and improved customer experience is generating a wave of terminal projects that are transforming America’s air travel gateways. Renovations include turning away from multiple security checkpoints and centralizing infrastructure to allow for greater scalability, and can be seen across the industry, from the smallest regional facilities to large hubs. Current estimates project that the industry will spend more than $14 billion per year between now and 2017 on airport upgrades in the U.S. That’s the good news.

The bad news is that the nature of this work requires that much of it will be highly invasive, with projects located right in the heart of the airport, and construction firms will need to work with and among airport authorities, air carriers, concessionaires, the TSA and FAA, and passengers to minimize any impacts, carefully coordinating those renovations and expansions. By aligning best practices with those needs, contractors can best support all stakeholders affected by construction work.

AirportPicture

To deliver a replacement terminal at Houston’s George Bush Intercontinental Airport, we developed a multi-phase approach centered on taking as few of the existing aircraft gates out of service as possible

For example, next generation airports are maximizing efficiencies both on and off the tarmac, which means larger aircrafts with additional seats. The fuel-efficient Boeing 737-900ERs have a 25 percent bigger wing area, a 16-foot longer wingspan and 25 percent more seats than the Boeing 737-400s being retired. With more seats available, airports are accommodating more travelers, meaning the airport needs to be upsized. These re-gauging renovations require careful planning in order to make the process go smoothly while existing facilities are expanded with surgical precision. Bigger planes and bigger waiting areas mean there is a need for additional amenities, from restaurants to rest rooms. Contractors must carefully communicate and coordinate with all stakeholders.

How?

1. Communicate early and often, beginning with design review. Mock-ups are an important tool, allowing stakeholders to touch and feel new counters and other elements that will be installed.

2. Work out the phasing. Contractors must consider how passengers use airport infrastructure, phasing a job properly or working overnight in order to minimize impacts to passengers and other stakeholders. Our team experienced this first-hand at Philadelphia International Airport, where we were tasked with erecting a baggage conveyor bridge over the main airport departure road. In order to minimize impacts to the departure roadway, we prefabricated the bridge on site and erected it in a single eight-hour pick, rather than building it piecemeal over the roadway, which would have taken longer and required frequent closures. Additionally, Building Information Modelling (BIM) is increasingly useful as a tool for communicating construction plans and the phasing of the work to stakeholders.  By rendering the projects electronically, we can show those stakeholders more clearly where and when the work will take place.

3. Safety and security is central to everything. These complex renovations often require an extensive system of temporary walls, clear way finding and a rigorous badging program to keep the construction sites inside the terminal carefully insulated from nearby passengers. Coordinating with all parties prior to execution – especially the TSA – ensures timely and efficient project delivery. We have also developed tools like the inSite Monitor to enhance safety during construction. This tool remotely monitors the environmental conditions on a project, measuring noise, dust, vibration and other environmental factors and notifies our team immediately if conditions on the site go over acceptable levels.

The need to upgrade our outdated aviation facilities is clear, and airports and airlines are driving many of these changes in response to new customer expectations. Contractors can do their part to deliver efficient, flexible solutions that put the customer experience first and foremost. These trends in aviation construction reflect the interests of the modern traveler, which will continue to impact the way we will design and build airports.

This post originally was originally published on Aviation Pros.

 

MacAdam Glinn

MacAdam Glinn

Skanska USA Vice President - Aviation Center of Excellence National Director

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Our top 10 blog posts of 2014

Between the MetLife Stadium we constructed hosting the Super Bowl, completing a Santiago Calatrava masterpiece and making major progress on one of the largest U.S. public-private partnerships, it’s been an exciting year for us! As we close out the final days of 2014, we’re taking a look back at our ten most popular posts here on Constructive Thinking. We can’t wait for what 2015 will bring.

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Here are those posts, in order of popularity:

1.  Ever wonder how an underwater tunnel is built? Check out this step-by-step guide to the process currently underway at our joint venture’s Elizabeth River Tunnels P3 in Hampton Roads, Virginia: How we’re submersing 16,000-ton segments to create Virginia’s newest tunnel.

2.  This year’s Super Bowl saw the Seahawks and Broncos face off in MetLife Stadium, which we completed in 2010. The Seahawks took home the Vince Lombardi trophy inside one of the nation’s most technologically-advanced and energy-efficient stadiums. Here’s How to build a stadium that can tackle the Big Game.

3.  Before we could immerse the tunnel tubes for Elizabeth River Tunnels, first we had to float the 16,000-ton hollow concrete segments 220 miles down the Chesapeake Bay. We recapped the incredible journey in photos: Virginia’s latest highway tunnel begins with a trip down the Chesapeake Bay.

4.  Our high-stakes concrete pour at Miami’s Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science required 25 hours of non-stop placement to complete the suspended, martini glass-shaped 500,000-gallon seawater aquarium tank without any cracks. Gizmodo was impressed by our team’s precision. Watch teamwork in action in a stunning time-lapse: Our team was neither shaken nor stirred on this epic concrete pour.

5.  The Calatrava-designed Innovation, Science and Technology Building at Florida Polytechnic University is one of the most striking and challenging buildings we have built. This fall the university, the first STEM-focused college in the Sunshine State, welcomed its inaugural class of students. You don’t want to miss these pictures: This Calatrava masterpiece comes to life exactly as envisioned.

6.  At Skanska, we’re engaging with our clients to find ways to use building information modeling to improve the whole life cycle of buildings, not just during design and construction. For a facility owner, utilizing BIM for operations and maintenance uses can have substantial benefits. Here are Five ways virtual modeling can improve facilities management.

7.  Airports play an essential part in our economy and our lives. And yet, in the U.S. many of our airports have gone decades without major upgrades. MacAdam Glinn, national director of our Aviation Center of Excellence, examined the economic and consumer forces shaping our airports in the infographic The evolution of airports: trends in aviation construction and on NPR.

8.  Public-private partnerships are becoming increasingly important financing solutions for the nation’s crumbling infrastructure. While much attention has been focused on how P3s can help cities and states move forward on transportation projects, there’s growing interest in using P3s to improve such social infrastructure as courthouses and hospitals. Learn more in P3s aren’t just for transportation – here’s how they can help with public buildings too.

9.  As we work toward an Injury-Free Environment®, it’s essential to understand the potential hazards and the kinds of behaviors that can lead to harm. For Safety Week 2014, we crafted a visual reminder of what is at stake and what can be done to prevent accidents: It’s work, not war: How to prevent deadly harm in construction.

10.  From tunnel-boring machines to laser scanners, our teams get to build with some rather incredible equipment and technology. In downtown San Francisco, for example, we’re using two giant crawler cranes to assemble 24,000 tons of structural steel for the Transbay Transit Center, known as the Grand Central Station of the West. That steel weighs about the same as 111 Boeing 747-400s! Learn more in: Get to know the newest additions to the San Francisco skyline.

Skanska USA

Skanska USA

Skanska USA is one of the largest, most financially sound construction and development companies in the U.S., serving a broad range of clients in the public and private sectors, including those in transportation, power, industrial, water/wastewater, healthcare, life science, education, sports & entertainment, data centers, government, aviation and commercial industries.

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Overnight, our team erects a new bridge at Philadelphia’s airport

After six months of detailed planning and intense coordination, our Philadelphia International Airport team last month erected a 91,000-pound, 100-foot-long pre-assembled baggage conveyor bridge over the main airport departure road in less than eight hours. While this was a very complicated activity, our team got it done smoothly, and even four days ahead of the original schedule for this milestone event.

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To ensure that nothing would hamper the erection, our team had a variety of contingency plans in place. For example, while extensive surveys had been done to ensure that the anchor bolts on the bridge piers would match with the holes on the pre-assembled bridge, temperature changes and flexing caused by the lifting could have slightly varied the geometry. So before the lift, our team developed a procedure for field repairs that the structural engineer approved.

Also, this task done overnight at the airport required closing the departures road, but if an airport emergency occurred, emergency response vehicles might have needed to go beyond the construction area. So they built a temporary blacktop road for that use.

“This was truly a collaborative effort involving the airlines, Division of Aviation, airport operations, Philadelphia airport police, PennDOT, the construction manager, trade contractors, the design team and Inspectors,” said Brian Maguire, project director. “Thank you to everyone who helped make this event a tremendous success!”

This lift is part of a $44 million lump sum general contract we have with client US Airways. Our work also includes building a 35,000-square-foot bag-claim facility and 40,000 square feet of phased renovations to Terminal F and an adjacent connector.

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Skanska USA

Skanska USA

Skanska USA is one of the largest, most financially sound construction and development companies in the U.S., serving a broad range of clients in the public and private sectors, including those in transportation, power, industrial, water/wastewater, healthcare, life science, education, sports & entertainment, data centers, government, aviation and commercial industries.

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What upgauging means for airport design

The air travel world is entering a period of dramatic transformation, thanks to significant internal changes (including mergers and acquisitions) and external changes, such as rising fuel costs and new technologies. Not only will tomorrow’s airlines and airplanes need to be different to adapt to this shifting environment, but airports will need to evolve too.

One key change is that in responding to higher fuel costs, technological advancements and shifting travel markets, airlines have increasingly been “upgauging” to larger jets, rendering the previously favored smaller, regional jets uneconomical. Compared to the 50- to 100-seat regional jets, larger planes like the Boeing 737-800 and the Airbus 321 are far more fuel efficient and provide better value in terms of seat-miles for airlines. It’s clear that the upgauging trend will have lasting impacts on the industry, especially where it comes to airport design.

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Airport owners will need to rethink the layouts of their facilities in order to stay ahead of the upgauging trend. Terminals at smaller airports designed for slim regional jets, with gates close together, will need to be reconfigured to accommodate airlines’ new fleets. They will also likely require new jet bridges that can accommodate larger planes and connect them to terminals.

However, it is not just what happens on the tarmac that will have to be redesigned, but also the interior layout of terminals. Internal corridor space will have to be re-sized to handle the increased number of passengers disembarking from the larger planes. Passenger hold areas will have to increase in size to accommodate the greater number of passengers on each flight. Concession areas will have to expand as well to serve the additional travelers, and to help defray the costs of renovations. Without these changes, it will become more difficult for airlines to serve outdated airports, likely resulting in less service – something that is a loss for airlines, passengers and cities.

Major airports, home to specialized regional terminals that may retain that service for the time being, will have to make design changes as well, as forward-looking airport authorities will opt to create flexible spaces that can be sustained over many stages of industry evolution. As airlines continue to move towards bigger, more-fuel efficient jets, airport design will continue to evolve along with it.

As builders and providers of facility solutions, we are constantly seeking ways to assist our aviation clients in meeting their business goals. We work hard to understand the factors that are affecting our clients’ businesses, so we can be their partner in developing solutions.

MacAdam Glinn

MacAdam Glinn

Skanska USA Vice President - Aviation Center of Excellence National Director

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“Be Bold” lessons for women in the workforce: A Q&A with Skanska Project Engineer Lindsey Glasgow

At just 26, Skanska Project Engineer Lindsey Glasgow is already making a name for herself in the industry. Philadelphia Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown selected Glasgow as one of 10 up-and-coming female leaders.

Glasgow also has been featured in the Philadelphia Business Journal and invited by the Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce to speak at their Women in the Workforce event.

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Lindsey leading a session at Women in the Workforce.

As one of five panelists at the Women In the Workforce event, she provided insights on such important topics as networking, personal branding and mentoring. Following a  30-minute Q&A session in front of an audience of 120 women, she rotated among small breakout groups and led interactive discussions, answered questions and provided further insight into their career choices and what it takes to become successful.

We asked Glasgow to share her journey to Skanska and her thoughts on what it takes to succeed as an engineer:

What are you working on at Skanska?

I am currently working on the Philadelphia International Airport Terminal F Renovation and Baggage Claim Addition. I am in charge of several trades including steel, miscellaneous, metals, elevators/escalators and several interior finish trades. The project is scheduled to be complete at the end of 2015.

How and when did you decide to become an engineer?

I was going to school for architecture (at Philadelphia University) and was more interested in how the building was actually being built rather than designing it, so I decided to go back to school to get my master’s degree in construction management.

What advice would you give other women looking to pursue a career in this field?

Be confident in yourself and don’t be afraid to speak up and ask questions. Find a female mentor if you can. Network as much as possible and join professional organizations that are relevant to the industry, such as the National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC).

What have you learned since joining the Skanska team?

I’ve learned so much in the past three years at Skanska! The most important thing is that Skanska wants to help me grow. Each year, a new goal and development path is created during review time and that gives me something to really focus my energy on.

What would you say has helped make you successful in your role with Skanska?

Skanska provides training of all types to the project engineers and other employees to help us learn different aspects of construction, and to also better understand Skanska’s procedures. For instance, we are trained about the best ways to write contracts, and we’ve also gone to a project site to learn about assembling a crane.

As a woman in a male-dominated field, what actions or decisions of yours have been the most helpful? What would you recommend to other young female engineers?

You need to be outgoing and bold. When you want to learn something new, or if you don’t understand why something is being built a certain way, talk to the people that are doing the actual work in the field. Most of them are proud of what they do and are eager to answer your questions to help you understand and learn.

What are your plans for your future in the industry?

My plan is to continue to grow my career with Skanska and eventually work more on the operations side of the company as a project executive or project director.

What do you think can/should be done to encourage more women to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)?

If women are interested in engineering or architecture, they should shadow a woman that works in that field while they are in high school so they can really see what it’s like and not be intimidated just because it is male-dominated. Also, women in STEM careers should encourage more women to join their ranks.

Skanska USA

Skanska USA

Skanska USA is one of the largest, most financially sound construction and development companies in the U.S., serving a broad range of clients in the public and private sectors, including those in transportation, power, industrial, water/wastewater, healthcare, life science, education, sports & entertainment, data centers, government, aviation and commercial industries.

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